Press Release: New Tavistock Legal Ruling on Puberty Blockers

The legal decision this morning, in the Family division of the High Court, provides important clarification. It is likely to be a relief to young people with gender dysphoria and their families.
In December, the High Court found that young people under 16 with gender dysphoria were highly unlikely to be able to understand the complexities and uncertainties of puberty blocking treatment. That meant that they could not consent (on their own) to treatment. The court recommended that doctors and families go to court to seek permission to start treatment.
That decision has caused great uncertainty for a large number of vulnerable teenagers with gender dysphoria who had previously been started on treatment or were awaiting treatment. It wasn’t clear whether they would be able to receive puberty blockers.
The decision today clarifies that parents of young people with gender dysphoria can consent to puberty blocking treatment on behalf of the young person. Where the parents, doctors and young person are all in agreement about this, there is no need to go to court.
 
This court decision reinforces a long established ethical approach to medical treatment in children and young people. The views of the child or young person should be sought. If the young person is sufficiently mature they may be able to consent on their own to the treatment in some cases. But where that isn’t the case, parents are able to consent to treatment that would be in the young person’s best interests (ie would be best overall for them). That ethical approach has long been adopted, in this country and others, for young people needing surgery or chemotherapy or other medical treatment. It applies to extremely important life and death decisions (for example about stopping life support). It also applies to puberty blockers.
Debate about the role of puberty blockers in young people and children is likely to continue. But this decision means that where doctors believe that it would be best for the young person to have this treatment, the young person wants the treatment and parents consent, the treatment can legally be provided.”
Professor Dominic Wilkinson
Professor of Medical Ethics, University of Oxford
Consultant Neonatologist

No conflicts of interest

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Reddit

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use the <em>, <strong> and <blockquote> tags. Links have been disabled to combat spam.

Notify me of followup comments via e-mail. You can also subscribe without commenting.

Authors

Affiliations